Shrink My Tunes

Discussion in 'iPod touch' started by bloot, Jan 20, 2008.

  1. bloot

    bloot New Member

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    There is this application called ShrinkMyTunes it supposedly drops the bit rate a slight bit ( supposed to be unnoticeable on an mp3 player ) but it can reduce your song to four times it's size. Has anyone heard of this or have it ? If you have it PM me.
  2. Mindfield

    Mindfield New Member

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    "Supposed to be noticeable" is a matter of opinion. I can tell the difference between an MP3 at 128kb/s and 160kb/s. And anyway, what's the point of such an app? You can batch-convert MP3s to lower bitrates with any number of apps out there. If you're not an audiophile and don't mind putting up with some audio artifacting (if you can detect it) then go for it. I can't though. I can put up with 128k/s, but I'm much happier with 160k/s or better, especially since I use mid-to-high-end in-ear monitors that can pick up artifacts pretty well.

    Another possibility: Convert your MP3s to 128k AAC. They're smaller, and AAC achieves better audio compression with less artifacting, so you can get away with 128k AAC that still sounds like 192k MP3.
  3. bloot

    bloot New Member

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    The thing is is that I am completely new to this thing. My last iPod I had was 20gb so I never really worried about it. I'm in possession of an 8gb iPod Touch now and I am running out of space, for music that is. How would I go about doing something like that ?
  4. Mindfield

    Mindfield New Member

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    The easiest way: In iTunes, highlight all songs in your library (or selectively highlight just the ones you want to convert), right-click, and select "Convert selection to AAC." Then delete the songs you just converted off your iPod and copy the newly converted ones to your iPod from the library. (You may also delete the original MP3s, as once converted it will just create a copy in your library)

    To give you an idea of the space savings, I just converted a 6.6mb song at 192kb/s quality to an AAC. The converted file turned into a 126kb/s AAC at a physical size of 4.4mb, which is 34% smaller than its original MP3 counterpart. The quality was just about identical, with the only significant difference being that the AAC version was lower in volume.

    Now, obviously the savings in space is going to depend on what bitrate your songs are at. Lower quality MP3s (128kb/s) aren't going to experience much reduction in size when converted to AAC so you won't save much there, but higher quality MP3s will definitely benefit.

    Try it on one or two of your own higher quality MP3s first and test the difference in quality before you commit to doing all of them. I think you'll find though that AAC does a good job of maintaining quality even at bitrates that would be considered low for MP3.

    NOTE: You can only do this to songs that are in your library. You can't convert songs directly on your Touch.
  5. Danls92

    Danls92 Super Moderator Emeritus Staff Member

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    I tried this program, and the extra space is nice but in my opinion it just isn't a good enough trade off for all of the sound quality you lose.

    Now, I'm a musician so I'm very sensitive to the quality of music. It might not be the same for you. I'd try Mindfield's advice and see if you can take the loss of quality before you convert. If you don't mind it, by all means go ahead. Otherwise, I'd not use it.
  6. AnotherFan

    AnotherFan New Member

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    This may sound as a noob question, but how would you know what bitrate your songs are to begin with?
  7. Mindfield

    Mindfield New Member

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    You can either right-click on a song and use "get info" to check the first tab for song details, or you can add the bitrate column to the ones already displayed. (Right-click on a column header and check Bit Rate. You can drag the columns around to the order you prefer.)

    I should point out that some songs will experience quality loss differently. Songs with a large dynamic range (lots of mids and highs in particular) will experience much more aliasing and artifacting (distortion) than songs without, and overtones are often lost or severely muddled when you compress too much. (This is why I choose higher quality; like Danls92, I'm a musician so distortion of any sort really hits my ears the wrong way.) Some people don't really mind though, or can't detect the difference, so for some people it's a good option.
  8. Danls92

    Danls92 Super Moderator Emeritus Staff Member

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    I believe songs from iTunes are normally 128kbps (DRM- free are 160kbps) and unless I'm mistaken, the default iTunes quality is 192kbps.
  9. Mindfield

    Mindfield New Member

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    Songs from the iTunes store are usually 128kbps AAC, and iTunes Plus (DRM-Free) tunes are usually 192kbps MP3. Converting MP3 to AAC in iTunes seems to create either a VBR or adaptive AAC file.

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