PSX4Iphone save compitability

Discussion in 'iOS Emulators' started by ThatGuyDest, May 6, 2010.

  1. ThatGuyDest

    ThatGuyDest New Member

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    Searching through the forums I saw one post which was unanswered about save game compatibility.

    Unlike the other post I don't want to download save states for games I am playing, but would like to swap them back and forth between my IPod and PC.

    Does anyone know if they are compatible with and PS1 emulators for PC?

    Thanks

    Dest
  2. AMurphy

    AMurphy Banned

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    im not entirely sure , but i must warn you, you are bordering piracy
  3. ThatGuyDest

    ThatGuyDest New Member

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    I didn't know emulators were piracy?
  4. SpoonIsTooBig

    SpoonIsTooBig Member

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    The emulators aren't but the roms are
  5. ThatGuyDest

    ThatGuyDest New Member

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    Not sure I follow?

    I'm not allowed to play any of my PS1 RPG's on my PC or Ipod? I have to by law play them on my PS1 and TV?
  6. SpoonIsTooBig

    SpoonIsTooBig Member

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    ROMs themselves are not illegal per se. This section gives a general discussion of the legal status of ROMs as regards the various uses to which they may be put, though this should not be construed as legal advice.
    [edit]Private ownership
    In some countries, it is legal for an individual to personally make backup copies of a game they own. Individuals may make backup copies for various reasons, perhaps as insurance against losing the game or as redundancy in the event that the original game's medium becomes unreadable. See the section on ROMs and Preservation.
    However, in the U.S. it has been illegal since 1983 for a user to create their own backups of video game ROMs onto other cartridges. This was decided in the court case of Atari v. JS&A. JS&A manufactured a "game backup" device that allowed users to dump their Atari ROMs onto a blank cartridge. JS&A argued that the archival rule allowed for this. The court disagreed, noting that ROM media was not subject to the same volatility as magnetic media (for which the law was created). Thus, not being so relatively vulnerable, ROMs were not applicable under section 17 USC 117(a)(2).
    Some games companies, such as Nintendo, print warnings inside their game manuals that they do not allow users to make backup or archival copies. Whether or not these warnings in this specific form can be considered valid contracts is legally questionable. For an overview of relevant issues, see user agreement (EULA), shrink wrap contract, clickwrap, Fair Use, Fair Dealing and DMCA.
    [edit]Official licenses
    It is, of course, legal to purchase a ROM image which has been licensed to you by the rights holder. For example, Atari once made a number of their original arcade games available in ROM format which is compatible with the MAME emulator through the online ROM retailer Star ROMs. Nintendo provides a service on their 7th generation console, the Wii, that allows players to purchase old games from various systems, such as the NES, which will download a ROM image and emulator upon purchase (see Virtual Console). This is similar to the PlayStation Store re-releases of games for the original PlayStation for the PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Portable, and the Xbox Live Arcade's re-release of many old video games such as the original Sonic the Hedgehog for the Xbox 360.
    The vast majority of computer and video games from the history of such games are no longer manufactured. As such, the copyright holders of some games have offered free licenses to those games, often on the condition that they be used for non-commercial purposes only. For example, fourteen of the games emulated in MAME, including Gridlee and Robby Roto, have been made available under such licenses and are distributed by the MAME project.[5]
    [edit]Unlicensed ROMs
    While some games which no longer make any profit fit into the category above, the vast majority are no longer available in any form. The legality of obtaining such games varies from country to country. Some countries have special exceptions in copyright laws or case law which permit (or discourage less) copying when an item is not available for legal purchase or when the copying is for non-commercial or research purposes, while other countries may make such practises firmly illegal. There is often a distinction drawn between distribution and downloading, with distribution being seen as the greater offence.
    Commercial distribution of copyrighted games without the consent of the copyright holder is generally illegal in almost all countries, with those who take part in such activities being liable for both criminal and civil penalties. Online auction sites such as eBay have sometimes been used by sellers to sell unauthorised copies of games which are advertised as legitimate copies. Such sellers, in addition to violating copyright laws, may also be prosecuted for fraud or false advertising.
    [edit]Abandonware
    Main article: Abandonware
    It is often the case that games still under copyright protection are no longer sold or marketed by their copyright holders. This may be due to the perceived lack of demand or for other reasons. Some hobbyists engaged in ROM trading claim that such games should be deemed abandoned by their respective copyright holders so that the games, classed as abandonware, can be freely traded. However, the copyright laws of most countries, including all signatories of the Berne Convention, grant copyright holders the exclusive right to distribute, or not distribute, a work until such time as the copyright expires under law or is granted to the public domain by the copyright holder.
    [edit]Legal enforcement
    There have been few convictions and lawsuits related to ROM trading. Criminal convictions tend to be related to high-profile warez groups which trade combinations of recent films and computer games. In contrast, the ROM scene tends to concentrate mostly on older games. Given the lack of continuing profit from most older games, the grievances of games companies rarely exceed sending a cease and desist letter which demands that the recipient stop distributing the copyrighted works in question.
  7. ThatGuyDest

    ThatGuyDest New Member

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    I'll assume no one knows.

    Thanks guys

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