Please explain

Discussion in 'iPod touch' started by mikayleach, Mar 30, 2010.

  1. mikayleach

    mikayleach New Member

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    Okay, so as we all know... jailbreaks are basically what people use this site for, people want up to date news and want help with almost every aspect of their ipods.

    But, with the news on the front page it sounds like every developer is struggling more and more to find a "hole" with each new software release.....

    does this mean in the near future jailbreaking will become a thing of the past, since no up to date software will be modify-able?
  2. ChrisL

    ChrisL Well-Known Member

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    Well, as long as we keep finding exploits, Apple will keep patching them in their next firmware update or iPhone/iPod Touch update. So yea, eventually there will be no more exploits and we will be living in an unjailbroken world. Of course, some people believe that there will always be exploits, but they will just be harder to find. Anyways, we will see what happens in the future, there's nothing we can really do about it now.
  3. mikayleach

    mikayleach New Member

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    Well that kind of sucks. they are going to keep reviewing and exposing the exploits.... apple will patch them and at some point there will be none left
  4. br0adband

    br0adband New Member

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    No, because in the process of fixing one thing, more than likely - as is so often the case - something else gets broken, hence new exploits.

    When a firmware is adopted and released, people - usually the devs, whoever - look over it hoping to find "holes" since in the process of adding new stuff or enabling new features on these devices, obviously something is going to go wrong sooner or later.

    Regardless of what Apple likes to think and profess about OSX or the iPhone OS as well, neither is perfect and both of them have holes, and every time a "new" version comes out with new features, etc, there's going to be something in there that can more often than not be exploited.

    The issue is catching/finding the exploits and then discovering a way to actually make use of them to enable a Jailbreak scenario. I don't believe anything will ever be 100% solid and secure, especially on these types of devices. The constant search for new features, enabling stuff that's locked in a previous version of firmware (like the Bluetooth capability in older iPods unlocked with newer firmware versions), all that stuff plays into it.

    What the devs and others working on the Jailbreaks have done - and this is just my understanding - is to consistently look for specific types of exploits they can put into action, and as each new one is found, Apple comes out with a patch aka a new revision of firmware to address it, and then a new exploit is typically discovered in that new revision, then another patch, another hole found, etc.

    It's a back and forth cat and mouse kinda thing, for the most part. It'll never end because in the process of creating new firmwares the holes are always going to be there, it's just a question of finding them and how long it takes.

    Sometimes the people looking for them get lucky, sometimes it takes weeks, months, perhaps even longer.

    The point is: every time somebody creates a so-called secure and "unbreakable" way of doing things, some kid in a basement - I'm being facetious here, just for the record - will find a way that to him or her is the simplest thing ever.

    "Wow, that was easy..." has been said more than you can imagine when things get broken or cracked.

    Imagine the reaction the person had years ago when they discovered how to defeat Sony's CD copy/rip protection using a Magic Marker.

    It's that kind of stuff that legends are made of...

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    In my opinion, if an exploit for 3.1.3 exists, I think it should be released. As soon as it's "fixed," then fine, work begins on finding a new hole, but at least people can actually make use of devices with that firmware, especially those that ended up with it through no "fault" of their own, buying something new, forced upgrades due to defective hardware replacements, etc.

    My opinion, of course, but geez... I'm old school, I come from a time when this stuff was totally open and there was no elitist "group" mentality.

    Information wants to be free, period, and it should be free, not held up for reasons that don't matter in the long run anyway.

    Stuff breaks, it gets fixed, in the process of fixing it another thing breaks, that gets fixed, then something else goes wrong, etc. It will never end...
  5. jkriall

    jkriall New Member

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    Thing is apple could actually make a whole bunch of legal money out of loads of the stuff ppl jailbreak to get. I dnt understand why they don't take advantage of stuff like winterboard/ makeitmine etc instead of acting like everything jailbroken is bad and they have to stop anyone having it. I mean ffs we bought the ipods, they don't own them anymore.
  6. narwal13

    narwal13 Active Member

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    how do the dev team "see" the holes in the firmware? is there some sort of decryption program they use?

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