Open up that last 2 gb?

Discussion in 'iPod touch' started by FluxBox, Dec 29, 2007.

  1. FluxBox

    FluxBox New Member

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    Come on. It's advertised as a 16gb iPod Ttouch. Not a 14.84gb iPod Touch.
    Are there any hacks/mods/techniques to open up that last ~2gb of space?
  2. eric_chaos

    eric_chaos Well-Known Member

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    Its used for formatting. If you opened it up, your ipod would not work.
  3. Rdude

    Rdude Member

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    Doubt it, I think those 2 gigs are what holds the main files like the when you force restore that is where the backup files are located.
  4. crimsonangel

    crimsonangel New Member

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    Nope, and there is 16 gigs in there, however if you freed the last 2gigs up, all you would be doing is messing your ipod up. THe 2 gigs that are being used is for the ipods interface and operating coding. Without that, your ipod will not function. Rather then freeing those 2 gigs up, you can do numerous things to simply compress the files you have on your ipod.

    So to answer your question, yes you can free up the last 2 gigs if you just wanted a useless metal brick.
  5. FluxBox

    FluxBox New Member

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    Thanks for that last response. It pretty much answered me perfectly.
    I knew the operating system resided there, but in Windows you can still save to /WINDOWS/system32, so I was just wondering.
  6. Mindfield

    Mindfield New Member

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    Actually, it's not for the OS -- there is a partition dedicated to it, yes, but that only accounts for a portion of the missing space. The rest is due to the formatting, and is the same thing that happens with hard drives.

    Let's say a hard drive is advertised as being 100 gigs. Now, they redefine "gigabyte" as being 1,000 megabytes instead of the mathematically correct 1,024 megabytes, but that's a marketing rant of a different kind.

    Beyond being lexically incorrect, there's also the fact that the advertised space is the amount of unformatted space that is available. That is, the amount of space that the drive can hold before it is formatted.

    Sounds dumb, right? What good is unformatted space? Actually, there's a very good reason for it. The manufacturers don't know how much free space is going to be available after formatting, because the very process of formatting it takes up space. This space it uses is a necessity of every file system on the planet: Your file allocation table. This is an area of space that is reserved in order to store all of the information it needs about every file that's going to be stored on it: The filename, size, location of the start sector, file attributes, security permissions, and any other bits of information it needs.

    The amount of space this takes up depends on the filesystem it is formatted to. FAT will take a different amount of space than FAT32, which will take up a different amount of space than NTFS, HFS, LinuxFS, and so on. What's more, your file allocation table has built-in redundancy: Every table has an identical twin stored for backup purposes in the event that one becomes corrupted. Now, the manufacturer doesn't know what you're going to do with this drive or what filesystem you are going to format it under or how many partitions you're going to have (this makes a difference, too), so the only reliable, consistent capacity figure they can advertise is the amount of unformatted space it has. Realistically, that 100 gig drive I mentioned earlier will, after formatting, only have about 94 gigs of usable space on it, because about 3+ gigs were "lost" due to their definition of "gigabyte" and the rest were used for the file allocation tables.

    This holds true for flash-based storage devices, too. You will never get the amount of advertised space after you've formatted the device for just this reason.

    The iPod Touch is no different -- and there's no hidden space reserved for the OS; its' all right there in plain view, which you can see just by typing "df" from a command prompt (Term-VT100 or a terminal window in WinSCP) which will show you the space available and used for both the OS/app partition and the music partition. The "missing" space isn't really missing at all; it was used when the device's storage area was formatted.

    This is nothing new, either. It's been like this since the dawn of digital storage.
  7. DerekVOF

    DerekVOF Active Member

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    Read this article at About.com -- http://compreviews.about.com/od/storage/a/ActualHDSizes.htm

    Some "high points" -

  8. linds

    linds New Member

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    It's the way they advertise space on hard drives and stuff.

    Manufacturer's advertise 1GB as 1000MB ... but in reality, 1GB = 1024MB.

    This is done in binary. So you take 16,000,000,000 bytes and divide it by 1024 three times and you get 14.9

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