Legal Question... about safari

Discussion in 'iPod touch' started by emanuelme, Nov 24, 2008.

  1. emanuelme

    emanuelme New Member

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    So for those of you old enough to remember the good old microsoft days in the 90's with windows 95, 98 and then xp / windows me etc... here's a question...

    microsoft used to bundle IE with windows without an option to delete it and it was considered illegal because it did not allow competition... why is it that apple can get away with only allowing safari? I really dont want apple bashing in this thread... i'm asking it purely as a legal question... considering it is an OS, why is it that they can limit the browsers, etc?

    thanks.
  2. Jarlath

    Jarlath Retired Moderator

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    The reason Apple gets away with it is because the current United States government has bigger fish to fry than one technology company with the current low-intensity conflicts overseas as well as an economic meltdown and possible energy crisis. And unlike Microsoft, iPods only come with one operating system because they're manufactured by one company, whereas PCs of the time had come with multiple operating systems up until Microsoft started throwing their weight around, AND IE didn't come bundled with Windows until Netscape Navigator 3 had become popular... at which point Microsoft started including Internet Explorer 4 as 'part' of the operating system and killed Netscape's business.

    The iPod is different in that Apple manufactures the whole product, and because there's never EVER been anyone else who's really been allowed to produce software for the iPod save under Apple's aegis, as they controlled the hardware and operating system absolutely. There was never a market to run software on the iPod until the Touch showed up, except under Apple's strict limits with iPod games. The only reason jailbreak applications exist is because the iPod Touch has a full operating system on it, and now Apple's taking advantage of that sudden market to extend their business over to the App Store for the iPod as well... and the SDK rules explicitly forbid anyone accessing frameworks that Apple has restricted. Unlike the IE case, which was only a subset of the whole Microsoft monopoly judgement, there were no other businesses competing with Apple to run programs on the iPod that Apple forced out of business, and the iPod was never out of Apple's control.
  3. Ryan

    Ryan Well-Known Member

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    ^ best answer ive ever seen.


    Apple has control over their device, its up to them what they want to allow on it.
  4. SumDaii

    SumDaii Active Member

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    WOW, well nuff said...

    although i would hurt my eyes reading that novel!

    lol
  5. Jarlath

    Jarlath Retired Moderator

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    Just remember that Microsoft Internet Explorer used to be NCSA Mosaic and was originally sold separately as part of the Microsoft Plus package for Windows 95. After Netscape proved popular and that a market existed for web browsers (at that time, people were actually willing to pay good money for a graphical web experience), Microsoft struck back at the existing browser market by bundling with Windows 95 OSR 1, and then IE3 came with OSR2, before Windows 98 came out with IE 4. That killed the browser sales of Netscape at the time, and they never recovered from it... and Opera, years later, never really got their 'business' of selling the browser off the ground either because IE was installed and then integrated into the Windows OS. This sort of action was targetable under the monopolization rules, which combined with the permissive Clinton administration, let Federal prosecutors target Microsoft (who had an effective hegemony over the consumer OS, office software, and other markets) and encouraged European businesses to do the same thing through the EC.

    This is definitely not the case with Apple - yes, they control everything on the iPod, but they're not the only maker of music players out there, nor are customers restricted to buying music only from iTunes. Nor have they sued Creative to stop marketing music players or done anything that would technically violate the antitrust rules in the way Microsoft was accused of (and convicted of) doing. There's no way to compare the two cases, any more than one can sue Sony for not offering third-party web browsers on the PSP/PS3, or hitting Nintendo up with a lawsuit for not allowing the Wii to play DVD discs.

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