iMessages

Discussion in 'iFans en Français' started by PurplePhone, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. PurplePhone

    PurplePhone New Member

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    Bonjour,
    J'ai un iPod touch 8GB, et mes paramètres wifi sont parfaitement réglés puisque je peux accéder à internet depuis mon iPod.
    Cependant, je ne parviens pas à me connecter à iMessages. Je fais démarrer, je tape mon identifiant Apple ainsi quebmon mdp Apple et ensuite ils me demandent quelle adresse mail je veux utiliser, je la tape, et ensuite cela me met vérification et ça revient à la page précédente. Et ce éternellement.. Parfois ils me demandenr un mdp après mon adresse mail mais je ne sais ps lequel mettre. J'ai essayé mon mdp Apple, le mdp de mon adresse mail. Rien n'y fait.
    Aidez moi s'il vous plait.

    Merci d'avance pour vos réponses.

    ( J'ai le même problème avec Facetime. )
  2. EMINEMFAN001

    EMINEMFAN001 Member

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    Bonjour, Je me appelle Paul , cava ?
  3. PurplePhone

    PurplePhone New Member

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    Euh.. Oui et vous ? Mais pourquoi vous me demandez ça ? Vous pouvez répondre à mon problème ?
    Vous êtes anglais ? Ou américain ?
  4. Picu97

    Picu97 Active Member

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    Premièrement, essayez d'utiliser un ID différent d'Apple

    Si cela ne fonctionne pas, essayez de restaurer via iTunes. Cela peut résoudre le problème.
  5. terhoence

    terhoence New Member

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    You could always restore after you brick it! It just sounds horrifying!
  6. ThibaultAnd

    ThibaultAnd Member

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    Bonjour, Je me appelle Thibault, cava ?

    Hahaha en tout cas je suis un vrai Français moi xD Bref essaye d'utiliser les DNS publics de google (en gros tu les paramètres DNS de ton wifi (dans les paramètres wifi) par ceux de google : 8.8.8.8, 8.8.4.4 ;) (Il faut bien mettre les deux séparés par une virgule ;) )

    J'ai eu le même problème que toi avec mon 3gs et je l'ai résolu comme ça ^^
  7. ThibaultAnd

    ThibaultAnd Member

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    Essaye avec les dns public de google : 8.8.8.8, 8.8.4.4 (à modifier dans les paramètres wifi ;) )
  8. PurplePhone

    PurplePhone New Member

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    Bonjour, je me appelle Sarah, ca va ?

    Comme cela semblait etre la procédure, je l'ai fait. ;)

    J'ai essayé de changer d'identifiant ID mais rien ne marche..
    J'ai essayé les paramètres DNS de google mais rien ne marche..
    Je n'ai pas restauré mon iPod de peur de perdre des trucs importants que je n'ai nulle part ailleurs.

    Merci pour vos réponses, mais il me semble que je suis destinée a ne pas utiliser Facetime et iMessages. Voila voila, bonne journée a tous. :)
  9. JaneaneGarofalo

    JaneaneGarofalo New Member

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    http://www.*******************/cookies/35/b/happy.gif

    With today’s release of iOS 5, Apple has added a significant new feature to their Messages app with the introduction of iMessage. Seamlessly integrating into the existing Messages application, iMessage is a new service from Apple that acts as a replacement for the traditional text message service that comes with mobile phones.

    In actual fact, a more accurate description of the Messages app with iMessage on iOS 5 would be that it improves on the traditional text messaging service whilst maintaining compatibility with it. The new iMessage service works by associating a person with an Apple ID – rather than a particular device or SIM card as the traditional text message service does. This is one of iMessage’s advantages, you are not restricted to a single device and you can now use your iPad or iPod touch (and hopefully Mac soon) for receiving and sending messages to other people.

    Jump the break to read the rest of our iMessage overview.
    The Most Complete Personal Organization App. Period.
    How it works

    The Messages app on iOS 5 can send either an iMessage or a traditional text message, which one is used will depend entirely on who you are sending the message to. If the person you are sending the message to is also signed up for iMessage (determined by whether their phone number is on Apple’s database) then your message will be sent through iMessage – if they aren’t on Apple’s iMessage database it will go through the traditional text messaging service. This selection process and database check is done automatically and instantly, with no user action required.

    An important piece of information to convey here is that unlike the traditional text messaging service, iMessage is not tied to a particular device or SIM card – it uses an Apple ID. Consequently the Apple ID you entered during the iOS 5 set-up phase will be the one used, by default, for iMessage. The Apple ID can be changed from within the Settings app, but more importantly you can also set up “proxy” email addresses through which you can receive iMessages. These proxy addresses act as gateways through which iMessages can be funnelled into your Apple ID, which is what actually stores your messages. If you have an iPhone your phone number is also added automatically to this list of “proxies”.

    When sending an iMessage, it doesn’t matter whether you have that person’s Apple ID email, one of their proxy addresses or even their phone number – as long as they have associated it with their Apple ID, it will be sent to them through iMessage. Obviously if they do not have iMessage and you enter their email address, your message will not be sent, but if you enter their phone number the Messages app will revert to sending via the traditional text messaging service. The key point here is that the Messages app will default to sending messages through iMessage and revert back to the traditional text messaging service if iMessage isn’t available.
    iMessage = Traditional Text Message

    There really isn’t much difference between an iMessage and a traditional text message. Both can send text to one or more people whilst also supporting the transfer of images and videos. The only real difference is that there is a much higher word limit per iMessage and everything is transferred through the internet via the iMessage service, rather than a carrier – meaning no exorbitant costs for sending images or video. Similarly, any iMessage will be delivered with a push notification from the Messages app, just as it would be done if it was a traditional text message. From my experience, iMessage is as quick at sending and receiving messages – perhaps even a bit quicker, especially with multimedia. The iMessage service is fully encrypted and the service will display a “Delivered” note next to each message to indicate a successful delivery and there is also the option of sending ‘read receipts’ – these simply allow the other person (who sent the iMessage) to know that you have read their message.
    Messages on all your iOS devices

    A consequence of developing iMessage is that Apple can now offer the Messages app on the iPad and iPod touch because the service needs nothing more than an internet connection. It could well be (and it is my belief) that Apple specifically developed iMessage in order to get a good messaging service on the iPad. Apple is intent on seeing the iPad be the Post-PC device that is core to our digital lives and they have inched it closer to that reality with every iOS update. iOS 5′s big push has of course been the PC-Free and iCloud features which sever the shackles between the PC and the iPad – and iMessage should be seen as part of Apple’s move to make the iPad independent and distinct from other products.

    Text messaging is an increasingly important way of communication and for it to be restricted only to a mobile phone seems increasingly absurd with the advent of Facebook messaging, Twitter direct messages and a thriving selection of apps in the App Store. Independently those options work fine, but the user experience is not optimal, because users must remember what service to use for contacting a specific person. iMessage should help significantly reduce this confusion, and has potential to be even more significant if Apple plays its cards right.

    One shouldn’t discount the fact that the iPod touch also gets iMessage, making the device even more useful – particularly for older children and young teens who can now communicate with each other without parents worrying about giving their kids a phone and all the associated text messaging costs, when perhaps they don’t really need one yet.

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