I need help with MobileFinder. How do you create a SYMLINK?

Discussion in 'iTunes App Store Games & Apps' started by itouchnathan, Aug 30, 2008.

  1. itouchnathan

    itouchnathan New Member

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    I need help with MobileFinder. I want it to be able to view my downloads that are in var/mobile/Library/Downloads. Could someone please tell me how i could do this for 2.0.2 iPod Touch?
  2. 1adam1

    1adam1 Member

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    is this mobilefinder from the app store or the good old mobilefinder from the 1.1.4 days that has been ported?! And then what when you view the downloaded files? Can you watch them if they're mp4?
  3. itouchnathan

    itouchnathan New Member

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    This is from the appstore.
    How do you get the ported one?
    And do you actually know anything?
    Or are you here because of the same problem im having

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  4. 1adam1

    1adam1 Member

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    naw, I was confused because I didn't know you could do this with the one from the store but now that I think about it, it makes sense. I don't remember how to make a symlink but there's tons of tutorials on YouTube. Also as for the jailbreak mobilefinder, it hasn't been ported, but I assume it is as usual with these things, we just need to give it enough time to be ported. 2.x is still somewhat new. And what is the app store version capable of if you can indeed view the files you download with safari?
  5. cokewater

    cokewater New Member

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    Well there are two easiest solutions, one for mac and one for windows... For windows you want a program called WinSCP and for Mac you want a program called RBrowser. RBrowser will let you create a new symblic link folder, basically it has a "Make Alias" option like in the mac finder. WinSCP will let you change the folder already in MobileFinder into a symbolic link that you can point towards your Downloads folder. There is also a way to creat a symbolic link using Terminal (Mac), Putty (Windows) or MobileTerminal (using just touch or iphone), however it doesn't work for me when i wanted to get mobilefinder cooking.

    I did the RBrowser method so exactly step by step here is a quick guide:

    1. Download RBrowser and obtain a demo licence (sucks, but if you don't want to install windows on your beautiful apple comp it's the only option)

    2. Navigate to your mobilefinder application folder... go to var/mobile/Applications and then check each folder until you find mobilefinder. Note the Documents folder.

    3. Navigate to var/mobile/Library/ and click on Downloads

    4. Click File -> Create New Symbolic Link

    5. Move it into the MobileFinder documents folder.

    6. Kaching, you're in business
  6. itouchnathan

    itouchnathan New Member

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    Haha thanks, found this out about 7 minutes ago
    IT TOOK ME AGES TO FIND!
    Everyone made it sound so f***ing complicated, and then someone smart was just like:
    "Oh yeah go to blah blah blah and do this and your done."
    And i was like wtf noooo thats too easy, and then so i followed the directions and i was like SWEEET im done!
    And yeh. Thanks for the reply

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    haha
  7. Shadowriver

    Shadowriver Active Member

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    You can do it via SSH via good old ln command :> this is linux ln discription so there
    might be some differences, but basic use is the same:

    Code:
    ln
    
    Make links between files, by default, it makes hard links; with the `-s' option, it makes symbolic (or "soft") links.
    
    SYNTAX
          ln [Options]... target [Linkname]
    
          ln [Options]... target... Directory
    
    OPTIONS
    -b
    --backup
         Make a backup of each file that would otherwise be overwritten or
         removed.  *Note Backup options::.
    
    -d
    -F
    --directory
         Allow the super-user to make hard links to directories.
    
    -f
    --force
         Remove existing destination files.
    
    -i
    --interactive
         Prompt whether to remove existing destination files.
    
    -n
    --no-dereference
         When given an explicit destination that is a symlink to a
         directory, treat that destination as if it were a normal file.
    
         When the destination is an actual directory (not a symlink to one),
         there is no ambiguity.  The link is created in that directory.
         But when the specified destination is a symlink to a directory,
         there are two ways to treat the user's request.  `ln' can treat
         the destination just as it would a normal directory and create the
         link in it.  On the other hand, the destination can be viewed as a
         non-directory--as the symlink itself.  In that case, `ln' must
         delete or backup that symlink before creating the new link.  The
         default is to treat a destination that is a symlink to a directory
         just like a directory.
    
    -s
    --symbolic
         Make symbolic links instead of hard links.  This option merely
         produces an error message on systems that do not support symbolic
         links.
    
    -S SUFFIX
    --suffix=SUFFIX
         Append SUFFIX to each backup file made with `-b'.  *Note Backup
         options::.
    
    -v
    --verbose
         Print the name of each file before linking it.
    
    -V METHOD
    --version-control=METHOD
         Change the type of backups made with `-b'.  The METHOD argument
         can be `numbered' (or `t'), `existing' (or `nil'), or `never' (or
         `simple').
    
    DESCRIPTION
    
    * If the last argument names an existing directory, `ln' creates a link to each TARGET file in that directory, using the TARGETs'
    names. (But see the description of the `--no-dereference' option below.)
    
    * If two filenames are given, `ln' creates a link from the second to the first.
    
    * If one TARGET is given, `ln' creates a link to that file in the current directory.
    
    * It is an error if the last argument is not a directory and more than two files are given. Without `-f' or `-i' (see below), `ln' will not remove an existing file. Use the `--backup' option to make `ln' rename existing files.
    
    A "hard link" is another name for an existing file; the link and the original are indistinguishable. Technically speaking, they share the same inode, and the inode contains all the information about a file--indeed, it is not incorrect to say that the inode _is_ the file.
    On all existing implementations, you cannot make a hard link to a directory, and hard links cannot cross filesystem boundaries. (These restrictions are not mandated by POSIX, however.)
    
    "Symbolic links" ("symlinks" for short), on the other hand, are a special file type (which not all kernels support: System V release 3 (and older) systems lack symlinks) in which the link file actually refers to a different file, by name. When most operations (opening, reading, writing, and so on) are passed the symbolic link file, the kernel automatically "dereferences" the link and operates on the target of the link. But some operations (e.g., removing) work on the link file itself, rather than on its target.
    
    Examples:
    
    ln -s /some/name         # creates link ./name pointing to /some/name
    ln -s /some/name spud    # creates link ./spud pointing to /some/name
    ln -s a b ..             # creates links ../a and ../b pointing to ./a and ./b

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