Honda Have Done It.

Discussion in 'Computing, Science, and Technology' started by Abcmsaj, Dec 14, 2008.

  1. Abcmsaj

    Abcmsaj Retired Moderator

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    The first car to run on compressed Hydrogen (the most abundant element we know exists) and gives off the emissions of clean water vapour.

    This is revolutionary... At the moment though, it's only available in California. And I bet it'll cost a fortune.

    It's the Honda Clarity (Youtube it)
    http://automobiles.honda.com/fcx-clarity/

    I just want your thoughts though (Smart people) - Last time I checked... When they last used H for transport methods... It ended up in a colossal explosion killing hundreds of people. If we start putting Hydrogen into our cars and petrol stations - How long before the same thing happens?...
  2. ipNinja

    ipNinja New Member

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    Been watching Top Gear? lol

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  3. fear_2670

    fear_2670 Banned

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    That's cool and dangerous at the same time, and i live in California.
  4. thechungster

    thechungster Super Moderator Emeritus

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    Woo Top gear! Lol. Thing is, I've heard of it before, about several months ago.
  5. Abcmsaj

    Abcmsaj Retired Moderator

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    Yes. And I'm still in utter awe...
    It's incredible and it's going to change everything but my main worries are:

    Explosions.
    Cost.

    Ok yes... It's faster than electric cars and better for the environment because electricity comes from nuclear power plants which are heating up the atmosphere. And it's much better than seeing the petrol and oil come to an end by 2040. But... BANG.
  6. simonrichards150

    simonrichards150 New Member

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    While it looks very good, and Top Gear has done a good job promoting it, hydrogen fuel cells are still not very good.

    This is because it takes so much energy to extract the hydrogen in the first place that it makes the increased efficiency of the fuel cell itself negligible by comparison.

    Sorry I know that doesn't read very well but im so tired I don't care.
  7. ipNinja

    ipNinja New Member

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    While hydrogen has a wider flammability range than petrol, the range is only a piece of the story when considering the likelihood of afire resulting from hydrogen escaping into the atmosphere. Each fuel has different properties that must be considered along with flammability range.

    For example: Petrol's narrow flammability range is a bit misleading, since this range can easily and often be reached through normal consumer handling ofpetrol and certainly if spilled. There are of course petrol fires but, as we know, fires certainly don't occur every time petrol vapors are released to the open air, because the vapors fail to find an ignition source in time.

    Hydrogen has a wider flammabilityrange, but because it is lighter than air (50 times lighter than petrol vapors and even lighter than helium) and diffuses 12 times faster than petrol vapors do, it is very difficult for hydrogen gas to find a suitable ignition source in an open environment, like a fueling station.

    Hydrogen systems used for vehicular fueling are designed to provide public safety just as petrol systems are designed to do. While both fueling systems utilize break-away hoses, shear valves, and monitoring systems, hydrogen systems go a step further.

    Hydrogen fuelers are designed as "closed" systems, meaning that the fuel is not exposed to the atmosphere - unlike petrol which can be spilled fairly easily during refueling. This closed system design approach keeps hydrogen always within proper containment and does not allow oxygen or air to mix with the fuel, thereby eliminating one of the required combustion elements needed to create a fire. This further mitigates hydrogen's low ignition energy property, compared to petrol, by never allowing a spark or ignition source to have any ability to interact with the hydrogen gas.

    Source: Shell Hydrogen LLC
  8. Abcmsaj

    Abcmsaj Retired Moderator

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    The energy to remove Hydrogen from water is incredibly high... because you'd be breaking intermolecular forces FIRST and then you'd need high enough temperatures to break covalent bonds... So yes. THAT would be hard.

    But I'm sure it's not that difficult if it was able to power a cult of zeppelins back in the mid-century... If the Germans could do it then, we can do it now

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    For those who cba to read it:

    Hydrogen fueling stations have different safety systems to petrol stations. So if there was an accident, the hydrogen would not be exposed to the atmosphere - For example, you have to "latch" the hydrogen pump into your car's fueling hole to prevent spillage and compressed hydrogen blowing you backwards. Petrol would spill easily, especially when fueling when you get that last little bit on the floor when you go to put it back in its holster.

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  9. ZMOBtiger

    ZMOBtiger New Member

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    I think this is great. And the last time hydrogen was used for travel it was not used as the fuel. There was a massive amount involved as well. The hydrogen used for the car is in a small contained volume. If the car got in an accident though, there would be the problem of the hydrogen leaking into the air. It should float away though so as long as the crash does not cause the car to immediately catch on fire, you would be fine. A leak at the filling station would be much more problematic since the hydrogen would just float away. But i'm sure there are sensors employed that would alert the station. You shouldn't have an open flame at a gas station either though due to the fumes, so I don't really see more safety procedures that the customer should follow.
  10. jpga13

    jpga13 Banned

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    The cost of producing hydrogen based fuel is outrageous and the cars cost right at $1,000,000. Sign me up!

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