framework?

Discussion in 'iPod touch Firmware 2.X' started by saltedpotatos, Jun 11, 2008.

  1. saltedpotatos

    saltedpotatos New Member

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    In 2.0, there are new frameworks that apparently prevent loads of things. Everytime there was a question about 2.0, there would be something said about how there are new framworks and how they prevent something from doing something else. My question, that I probably should have asked a while ago when 2.0 was newer, is what is a framework? Or more specifically, how are the frameworks in 2.0 different from 1.1.x? Maybe the information is somoewhere but I'm too apathetic to look so any help is appreciated. Thanks. ( this was written on my iPod so im sorry for any mistakes, and you have no idea how many I made writing this disclaimer, which is ironic.)
  2. jpga13

    jpga13 Banned

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    What are Frameworks?

    A framework is a hierarchical directory that encapsulates shared resources, such as a dynamic shared library, nib files, image files, localized strings, header files, and reference documentation in a single package. Multiple applications can use all of these resources simultaneously. The system loads them into memory as needed and shares the one copy of the resource among all applications whenever possible.

    A framework is also a bundle and its contents can be accessed using Core Foundation Bundle Services or the Cocoa NSBundle class. However, unlike most bundles, a framework bundle does not appear in the Finder as an opaque file. A framework bundle is a standard directory that the user can navigate. This makes it easier for developers to browse the framework contents and view any included documentation and header files.

    Frameworks serve the same purpose as static and dynamic shared libraries, that is, they provide a library of routines that can be called by an application to perform a specific task. For example, the Application Kit and Foundation frameworks provide the programmatic interfaces for the Cocoa classes and methods. Frameworks offer the following advantages over static-linked libraries and other types of dynamic shared libraries:

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    Frameworks group related, but separate, resources together. This grouping makes it easier to install, uninstall, and locate those resources.
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    Frameworks can include a wider variety of resource types than libraries. For example, a framework can include any relevant header files and documentation.
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    Multiple versions of a framework can be included in the same bundle. This makes it possible to be backward compatible with older programs.
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    Only one copy of a framework’s read-only resources reside physically in-memory at any given time, regardless of how many processes are using those resources. This sharing of resources reduces the memory footprint of the system and helps improve performance.
  3. saltedpotatos

    saltedpotatos New Member

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    Thanks for that, err, informative post but plain english is always nice. I'm not a programmer of any sort so i got very little of that. Also, how are the 2.0 frameworks different from 1.1.x? Thanks though for posting, maybe i can try and translate that while i wait for a response.

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  4. aftershock68

    aftershock68 New Member

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    Okay the app is a cat. The frameworks are the bones of the cat.

    2.0's frameworks and 1.1.x's frameworks are diff because 2.0 uses xcode. Its like trying to run a windows program on a standard mac. Also, if you're not a dev, then why do you need to know this saltedpotatoes, if that's your real name.
  5. saltedpotatos

    saltedpotatos New Member

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    Thanks for the much plainer explanation. So because 2.0 is written in Xcode, the frameworks changed? So this points to the fact that the coding style changed from something to Xcode, which means that the particular coding language dictates the frameworks. But can't you code in objective c for both 2.0 and 1.1.x? So based on the potentially very flawed logic stated above, shouldn't the frameworks have changed that? So that you aren't able to code in objective c anymore? If you would like to answer these questions as well lol. The questions will never end. ( Also, the same disclaimer applies from the first post as well as me now writing this at 2 in the morning. Also aftershock, my name is not saltedpotatoes, its saltedpotatos. Hehe.)

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