Digital Rights Management FAQ

Discussion in 'iPod touch Firmware 2.X Jailbreak' started by Collateral, Jul 21, 2008.

  1. Collateral

    Collateral Active Member

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    Hopefully this will help the influx of noobs asking how to crack appstore apps..

    Have You ever wondered why iTunes music dosn't work on every computer or mp3 player you put it on? Have you ever wondered why you have to "Authorize" your computers? The answer is DRM.​

    DRM or Digital Rights Management is a generic term that refers to access control technologies used by hardware manufacturers, publishers and copyright holders to limit usage of digital media or devices. It can also refer to restrictions associated with specific instances of digital works or devices. DRM overlaps with software copy protection to some extent, however the term "DRM" is usually applied to creative media (music, films, etc.) whereas the term "copy protection" tends to refer to copy protection mechanisms in computer software.

    Digital rights management has been and is being used by content provider companies such as Sony, Apple Inc., Microsoft and the BBC.

    The Specific name of the type of DRM that apple uses is called "Fairplay."​


    FairPlay is a digital rights management (DRM) technology created by Apple Inc., based on technology created by the company Veridisc. FairPlay is built into the QuickTime multimedia software and used by the iPhone, iPod, iTunes, and iTunes Store and the App Store. Any protected song purchased from the iTunes Store with iTunes is encoded with FairPlay. FairPlay digitally encrypts AAC audio files and prevents users from playing these files on unauthorized computers.

    FairPlay-protected files are regular MP4 container files with an encrypted AAC audio stream. The audio stream is encrypted using the AES algorithm in combination with MD5 hashes. The master key required to decrypt the encrypted audio stream is also stored in encrypted form in the MP4 container file. The key required to decrypt the master key is called the "user key."

    Each time a customer uses iTunes to buy a track a new random user key is generated and used to encrypt the master key. The random user key is stored, together with the account information, on Apple’s servers, and also sent to iTunes. iTunes stores these keys in its own encrypted key repository. Using this key repository, iTunes is able to retrieve the user key required to decrypt the master key. Using the master key, iTunes is able to decrypt the AAC audio stream and play it.

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    When a user authorizes a new computer, iTunes sends a unique machine identifier to Apple’s servers. In return it receives all the user keys that are stored with the account information. This ensures that Apple is able to limit the number of computers that are authorized and makes sure that each authorized computer has all the user keys that are needed to play the tracks that it bought.

    When a user deauthorizes a computer, iTunes will instruct Apple’s servers to remove the unique machine identifier from their database, and at the same time it will remove all the user keys from its encrypted key repository.

    The iPod also has its own encrypted key repository. Every time a FairPlay-protected track is copied onto the iPod, iTunes will copy the user key from its own key repository to the key repository on the iPod. This makes sure that the iPod has everything it needs to play the encrypted AAC audio stream.

    FairPlay does not affect the ability of the file itself to be copied. It only manages the decryption of the audio content.


    RESTRICTIONS

    FairPlay-encrypted audio tracks allow the following:

    * The track may be copied to any number of iPod portable music players.
    * The track may be played on up to five (originally three) authorized computers simultaneously.
    * A particular playlist within iTunes containing a FairPlay-encrypted track can be copied to a CD only up to seven times (originally ten times) before the playlist must be changed.
    * The track may be copied to a standard Audio CD any number of times.
    o The resulting CD has no DRM and may be ripped, encoded and played back like any other CD. However, CDs created by users do not attain first sale rights and cannot be legally leased, lent, sold or distributed to others by the creator.
    o The CD audio still bears the artifacts of compression, so converting it back into a lossy format such as MP3 may aggravate the sound artifacts of encoding (see transcoding). When re-ripping such a CD one could use a lossless audio codec such as AIFF, Apple Lossless, FLAC or WAV however such files take up significantly more space than the original .m4p files

    At this time, it appears that the restrictions mentioned above are hard-coded into QuickTime and the iTunes application, and not configurable in the protected files themselves.

    Fairplay prevents iTunes customers from using the purchased music directly on any portable digital music player other than the Apple iPod, Motorola ROKR E1, Motorola SLVR, Motorola RAZR V3i,or iPhone.

    THIS APPLIES TO MUSIC, VIDEOS, AND APPLICATIONS

    CAN I TAKE AN APPLICATION FROM MY IPOD AND PUT IT ON MY FRIEND'S?
    NO. The DRM stops anyone except the buyer's ipod from reading/executing the application. This is also prohibited to speak of at IPTF

    WHAT IF I HAVE TWO COMPUTERS?
    In iTunes, go to STORE>AUTHORIZE COMPUTER. Your iTunes Music/Media will now work on both computers. You can only have 5 computers authozied at a time.

    ARE THERE WAYS TO CIRCUMVENT THE DRM?
    Everything is hackable, however please use your own googing skills and do not talk about cracking/circumventing DRM at IPTF

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    If there's anything else, tell me and ill add it.


    SOURCE: Wikipedia.
  2. MrBrightside

    MrBrightside Active Member

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    Was gunna say good post until I saw the wikipedia source at the bottom =P

    Naaa this will make things clearer for people and you added your own bit at the bottom (Y)
  3. ur_so_beautiful

    ur_so_beautiful New Member

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    People are lazy

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    Nice thread, i wouldn't have bothered looking on wikipedia about it

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  4. Collateral

    Collateral Active Member

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    Me either, but all the nooblets are starting to annoy me...
  5. BadKarma

    BadKarma Banned

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    Finally. To end the DRM rage between all those Noobs. Why don't people just BUY the apps.
  6. iKeablr

    iKeablr Active Member

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    Because it is fun to find a work around.
  7. Collateral

    Collateral Active Member

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    Yea, and you can find those workarounds on Google, trust me. Plus, you wont get banned or be a noob..
  8. Jarlath

    Jarlath Retired Moderator

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    Can we get a new rule? Like "People talking about how to pirate, asking for pirated, or insisting they SHOULD pirate wll be banned"? It'd cut down on the spam.
  9. Collateral

    Collateral Active Member

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    The funny part about that,

    We have that EXACT rule.
    ------------------double post merged------------------
    Updated with Pictures..
  10. desi_soulja

    desi_soulja Member

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    Apple's DRM is hard to crack.
    But it looks like it has already been cracked (actually not cracked, but people have managed to work around it) for one game... *not going to say what*
    The person who was able to work around it is trying to do the same for more applications now...

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