Back to Overclocking...

Discussion in 'iPod touch' started by redforeva, Mar 20, 2009.

  1. redforeva

    redforeva New Member

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    I don't want any comments like "you're gonna burn yourself" or "NO BATTERY OMG"

    Some people actually want to do this.

    Seriously, the Samsung ARM processor is clearly capable of speeds much higher than 412 (533 in the second gen) without any dangers. For one, it was designed with the fact that passive cooling is needed. Plus, the difference of 100 mAh is not a significant difference.

    Has anyone had any progress on the (sysctl -w hw.cpufrequency="frequency") command?

    I've tried looking at every single file connected to the command, and well, I've found nothing so far.
  2. theboss123

    theboss123 Banned

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  3. redforeva

    redforeva New Member

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    How about no?
  4. SmoothTroopa

    SmoothTroopa Member

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    well overclocking would be nice, but one question: where would we use the additional man power?
  5. iPod Touch™

    iPod Touch™ Banned

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    What is the piont of overclocking a touch?
  6. Noise...

    Noise... Banned

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    You overclock for the same reason that you would a computer. To get more processing power. The processor in the 1G touch, if I recall correctly, can go up to around 720MHz. As it is, it's underclocked in the Touch to 433MHz.

    Theoretically, you could overclock it to the 720MHz and have a machine that's going to be much faster. However, the issues with this are heat and battery power. You're nearly doubling your processor's power, so it's going to take a LOT more power - greatly reducing battery life. At the same time, that processor is going to heat up. Perhaps too much, and could damage itself or the unit.

    A better option would be a small overclock - instead of going to the max, go up by ~100MHz. That would give you better processing power, while not getting much hotter, and not taking up so much more battery power.
  7. freemini

    freemini Active Member

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    You mean making a 1G like a 2G?
  8. Noise...

    Noise... Banned

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    Sort of.

    The overclock would technically bump the processor up to the speed of the 2G (or a bit more, depending on how far you push it), however, the 2G uses a different processor, so while the end speed is nearly the same, the 1G's battery will sap faster, and the device will get a bit hotter.

    The 2G's processor is technically weaker than the 1G's. The difference is that the 2G's isn't underclocked. Apple upgraded to the new processor, as they're cheaper and easier on the battery.
  9. Duykur

    Duykur Banned

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    i can't believe you are asking us how to overclock a Cellphone CPU, really go and think about it for a second.
  10. Noise...

    Noise... Banned

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    A processor is a processor. Why be such a dick about it? It's a valid discussion, and something plenty of people would be interested in.

    If you don't like it, you don't have to participate in the thread.

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