AT&T capping upload speeds

Discussion in 'Front page news archive' started by News Bot, Jul 6, 2010.

  1. News Bot

    News Bot iFans.com News

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  2. mikeac

    mikeac Member

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    I laugh at AT&T.

    T-Mobile. 'nuff said.
  3. Al Roker

    Al Roker New Member

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    Wait, why is capping upload speeds necessary?
  4. edgar-ny

    edgar-ny Member

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    that sucks
  5. H3X

    H3X New Member

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    It may pay off, because it could lower the total bandwidth and increase download speed and range. That said, the ultimate goal would be to have an uncapped upload speed and max download speed and range.

    Also, kbps is kilobits per second, not kilobytes per second. A byte is 8 bits. You said in the article it's normally 1 megabyte per second. That would be 8 megabits per second, which is unbelievably fast. All download speeds are measures in bits, not bytes.
  6. Zedoack

    Zedoack Member

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    My download speed isn't that good over WiFi... :'(

    But wow...

    Please Register or Log in to view images

    What could having the upload restricted that much possibly be needed for?
  7. SpecKK

    SpecKK New Member

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    Transmission and Reception are asymmetric events between tower and handset. When a tower sends out data, it can send it at fairly high power in a limited direction(usually 120 degrees from base station).

    I have seen nothing to suggest direction controls in handsets. I believe cell phones tend to broadcast in all directions from a smaller antenna at a lower power. All 3 of those factors would diminish signal strength and increase the need for greater spectrum space between signals to avoid noise loss.

    I can see definite battery life extension from slowing down a power intensive transfer. It could be about making your iPhone battery life look somewhat less depressing. Or cutting back on officially reported radiation emission into your body. That said, it would be nice if users could turn off this "feature" when they really wanted something sent fast.

    I can see concerns about performance for all customers prompting upload caps as a preventative measure in congested markets, but there's little reason to cap underutilized base stations elsewhere.
  8. mikeac

    mikeac Member

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    Average consumers in the USA measure speed as KB/s, or KiloBytes per second. When most people do kbps in the US, they either don't know the difference between kb and KB, or made a typo.
  9. hydropunk

    hydropunk New Member

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    To clarify, what he's saying here is the article should read 1 megabit or 1 Mbps.
  10. awal

    awal Well-Known Member

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    No, we don't. Speeds are always measured in kbps.

    Interesting. I wonder what they consider to be "West Houston" because I'm on the west side of the city right now and my upload speed is 1267kbps.

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