Apple's Obsession With Secrecy

Discussion in 'General Apple Chat' started by MrFairladyz, Jun 23, 2009.

  1. MrFairladyz

    MrFairladyz Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    0
    Device:
    iPod touch
    In a feature article today, The New York Times reports on Apple's history of secrecy regarding its product plans and other company matters. While Apple's long history guarding of its product pipeline has fostered the growth of dedicated rumors site such as MacRumors, the company's unwillingness to share details related to Steve Jobs' medical leave of absence has cast renewed attention on Apple's devotion to secrecy.

    The report details the lengths Apple has gone to in guarding its secrets, beginning with limiting employee access to products under development.

    Beyond limiting access, Apple also routinely provides misinformation to reporters, analysts, and even its own employees. In many cases, Apple has gone as far as deliberately providing incorrect details to its employees as part of attempts to track down the sources of leaks.

    Regarding Steve Jobs' medical leave of absence during which he reportedly received a liver transplant, the report also addresses the controversy over whether Apple's lack of disclosure may even have violated federal laws regulating disclosure of health information for senior officials that could have material effects on companies' stock performance.

    In contrast to many companies that have adopted open communications policies, including adding blog and Twitter presences, Apple stands out as an innovative technology company that continues to shun such avenues of communications in favor of keeping information as close to the vest as possible. While the strategy provides a level of excitement regarding Apple's product announcements and undoubtedly provides the company with an advantage over its competitors in many cases, Apple's lack of transparency is regarded as an increasingly important issue from the perspective of investors, regulatory agencies, and the media.
  2. SiXAXiS

    SiXAXiS Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2007
    Messages:
    1,915
    Likes Received:
    5
    Device:
    iPhone 3GS (White)
    They are going to take over the world.
  3. SumDaii

    SumDaii Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2008
    Messages:
    6,297
    Likes Received:
    0
    Device:
    iPod touch
    WOW. Im nevar gona work for my fav company

    Please Register or Log in to view images

  4. drkassassin

    drkassassin New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    1,251
    Likes Received:
    26
    Device:
    2G iPod touch
    nice article..thanks for posting
  5. FruitRocks

    FruitRocks New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Messages:
    109
    Likes Received:
    0
    Device:
    2G iPod touch
    wow. and we thought that microsoft were lyers.
  6. Nburnes

    Nburnes Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2009
    Messages:
    9,022
    Likes Received:
    767
    Device:
    OnePlus One
    And this is how Apple stays ahead of everyone.
  7. jamil_d

    jamil_d Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2007
    Messages:
    2,041
    Likes Received:
    12
    Device:
    iPhone 3GS (Black)
    Exactly. By staying secret, they're at least five years of the competition. I mean, look, they released iPhone in 2007, when touchscreens were either unheard of or extremely unpopular.

    Security and secrecy makes things much better, except when it gets really annoying, such as when amateurs try and make up cryptic messages and think they're building up hype for some blog or website that nobody cares about. When the Dev-Team or Apple does it, it's exciting. When another nobody does it, it's lame. duykur
  8. S.I.D. CrAzY

    S.I.D. CrAzY Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2009
    Messages:
    1,056
    Likes Received:
    0
    Device:
    3G iPod touch
    Nintendo is very secretive as well.
  9. -Xi-

    -Xi- Banned

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Messages:
    286
    Likes Received:
    0
    Device:
    iPod touch
    They want to protect their inventions so that other companies can't steal them.

    I don't see a problem with that.

    As far as releasing incorrect information to find someone who's leaking info to other companies or the press? So what? That's someone who is taking information that they're trusted with, and then trying to sell it off to the media or highest bidding company. Why the hell shouldn't they be caught and fired?
  10. victorseif

    victorseif New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2009
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Device:
    2G iPod touch
    while i was on vacation my ipod was stolen what should i do
    let me now

Share This Page