802.11n and the iPod

Discussion in 'iPod touch' started by DaTruB, Sep 17, 2010.

  1. DaTruB

    DaTruB New Member

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    Hey guys, basically I got a new router which has 802.11g/b/n capabilities and I've been finding my ipod is EXTREMELY slow wifi wise. My 2nd generation works fine, but my 4g is just ridiculously slow.

    So I tinkered with the router and changed the interface type to 802.11g/b and voila, it worked.

    Any ideas why this is happening and how I can solve it? The iPod should be compatible with n wifi...
  2. Nilkin

    Nilkin New Member

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    Same is happening to me as well DaTruB, my Ipod touch 2g works fine but my new Touch 4g will work on my Sagem router but its really slow I ran a few checks on it found I was getting a ping of 4000-12000..

    I have a Wireless repeater router Edimax AP works fine on this, I find it very weird...
  3. TouchFaith

    TouchFaith New Member

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    For compatibility, routers broadcast on the lowest speed of any attached device. A B/G/N router paired with a G device will bump everyone down to G.

    Second, some routers (I suspect the earliest N routers to hit the market) have problems handling N speeds when set to B/G/N, and only perform close to 300mbps when set to "N only". Otherwise, N devices can get timeouts, poor connections, and slow speeds.

    A way around these headaches is often to employ two routers: one for N only and a B/G for everyone else (on a subnet).
  4. nickswitz

    nickswitz New Member

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    It's probably because the N networking is set to 5.0GHz, as opposed to the iPod's which is 2.4GHz just like b and g networking is, but it is slightly faster, but not by much.
  5. TouchFaith

    TouchFaith New Member

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    The iPT 4G's single-band chip doesn't support 5GHz. They wouldn't have slow or intermittent service; it wouldn't connect at all.
  6. DaTruB

    DaTruB New Member

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    ah thanks guys, I'll just leave it to g/b. I hardly got any n enabled devices anyway!
  7. dd_ny

    dd_ny New Member

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    Do you need a special router to get 802.11 on your iPod touch? And what is the point of it? Does it just make things move faster?
  8. mitchem

    mitchem Member

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    Also what type of encryption is used on your router? If it's WEP then your iPT would be connecting at a slower rate as 'N' isn't supported with that. You would need to change the encryption to WPA/WPA2 to get a wireless N connection.
  9. TouchFaith

    TouchFaith New Member

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    A/B/G/N are all part of the 802.11 standard. 802.11n ("N") can support speeds up to 300mbps, which is useful if you have, say, a ridiculously fast FIOS connection. You don't want your 54mbps 802.11g ("G") or 11mbps 802.11b ("B") router to act as a bottleneck.

    N routers are great for HTPCs, iPod Touch 4Gs, and other networked devices to talk to each other and transfer files incredibly fast across a home network.

    But if you just want to "get online" with your iPT 4G, you don't "need" N speeds at all. Many ISPs still offer DSL/Broadband speeds slower than a G router anyway.
  10. ryanangus

    ryanangus Active Member

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    I'm not concerned about speed of 802.11n (as explained above), but what about range? Have people noticed improved ranges?

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