Rockstar Updates GTA III for iOS; Adds iPhone 5 Support

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Rockstar Games recently updated Grand Theft Auto III to version 1.30, which optimizes the app for the iPhone 5, implements iCloud storage to maintain story progression across all iDevices, and allows users to create custom playlists with their own music. (more…)

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Guitar! by Smule is Simply Not Fun

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Smule, Inc.  | 47.7 MB | Free

Smule, one of the most prevalent music entertainment app developers, recently released their newest creation “Guitar!” in which players strum and pluck their way through a library of tracks spanning Jason Mraz to Ed Sheeran. You play through the game slowly but surely collecting coins,  hoping to unlock content such as more songs and guitars. Despite the solid foundation, “Guitar!“ fails to innovate in any noteworthy areas and instead brings a rather mediocre experience. (more…)

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Application Review: Hundreds

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Semi Secret Software, LLC | 26.6 MB | $2.99 (Sale Price, Regular $4.99)

The developer of the extremely popular endless runner Canabalt is at it again, with a minimalism-inspired puzzle game entitled Hundreds. As with Canabalt, Semi Secret Software has taken a simple mechanic and revitalized it in order to create something completely new and bizarre. (more…)

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Opinion: Do We Have the Right to Cheat?

My name is Adam Redmond, and I am a cheater. I exploited a score glitch in the classic game Tap Tap Revenge 3 in order to reach rank 171 within an hour. I deceived Tap Tap Revenge veterans by reaching a comparable high score without any effort whatsoever. I beat the system.

All it took was a jailbroken iPod touch, a shoddy YouTube tutorial, and iFile. Granted, all my ill-gotten gains were unlocked through single player, so I was not directly affecting another player’s experience. But do iOS players have the right to cheat?

A comparison between my legitimate score and the hacked leaderboards.

A comparison between my legitimate score and the hacked leaderboards.

Cheating in video games is not a matter etched in black and white. As I mentioned beforehand, I was not taking away from another player’s enjoyment of the game by using dishonest methods. I was merely enhancing my own experience. While one can say that it was unfair that I unlocked items without putting in the required effort, the bottom line is that I did not make the game unfair for the other players.

Other players had a completely fair chance at beating me in multiplayer. I did not alter that fact. If one wants to use known exploits to enhance his or her own experience, I think he or she should be able to. If someone has invested the time, money, and has the knowledge, why shouldn’t that individual be able to exercise the right to use the product in a way that he or she desires?

But what happens when someone’s decision to cheat infringes on another person’s ability to enjoy the game?  (more…)

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