Ubuntu Wants $32 Million to Build a Dual-Booting Smartphone

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See this phone? It’s the Ubuntu Edge, the first smartphone to use open source Ubuntu Touch software, and it can dual boot to Android as well. The people behind this device want you to help them build it – it’ll only cost a whopping $32 million in backers’ dollars to reach its funding goal. This is, as Ubuntu creator Canonical claims, the most ambitious crowd funding project to date. Will that help the Ubuntu Edge reach its funding goal, though? Or will it be a certain death sentence? Video and more after the break.

The project has until August 21st to reach its lofty goal, and Canonical says it would be “delighted” if it could repeat this experiment as “a regular thing.” It would be great if a company could just regularly raise 32 million dollars at will, wouldn’t it? If Canonical doesn’t reach its goal by August 21st, the Edge you see above simply won’t happen, and the Ubuntu team will simply continue to develop its touch OS in hopes that manufacturers will adopt it. Between these two scenarios, it certainly appears that raising $32 million will be the easy way to widespread adoption for the Ubuntu touch OS.

This beautifully crafted smartphone is a proving ground for the most advanced mobile technologies on the horizon, a showpiece for true mobile innovation. And at the heart of it all is convergence: connect to any monitor and this Ubuntu phone transforms into an Ubuntu PC, with a fully integrated desktop OS and shared access to all files.

Among the features that the Ubuntu Edge would supposedly pack are ”the latest, fastest processor,” with 4GB of RAM and 128GB of flash storage. The device would also feature a  4.5-inch, 720p screen covered in “pure sapphire crystal,” a substance Canonical says is ”the hardest natural substance after diamond.”  Other specs have been left open-ended with the assumption that fans will provide feedback when/if the phone is actually funded. That said, the phone is planned to pack some features we’ve come to expect from smartphones – 4G, NFC, and Bluetooth 4.0.

Here’s Canonical’s promo video used on their Indiegogo page:

For more information about the project, be sure to check out its Indiegogo campaign page. And if you think the device has any chance of being funded, you might want to do so. Whether or not it’s feasible, the hardware does look pretty sick. Best of luck to Canonical!

[Indiegogo via CNET]

 

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